Ric Flair Confirms His Wife, Wendy Barlow tested positive for COVID-19, Denies He’s Tested Positive

Ric Flair his wife, Wendy BarlowRic Flair told the New York Post that his wife, Wendy Barlow, tested positive for the virus while the couple lived in separate areas of their home.

 

WWE legend Ric Flair is denying that he contracted COVID-19 after he confirmed his wife, Wendy Barlow, is currently battling the virus.

Ric Flair and his wife Wendy Barlow

Ric Flair and his wife Wendy Barlow

In an interview with the New York Post, the 71-year-old said he and his wife were staying in separate areas of their home when she tested positive for coronavirus, which has proven especially dangerous for people over the age of 65.

“My wife does [have the virus] … we live in a 5,000 square foot home,” Flair, who lives in Georgia, told the Post. “I live in the basement. She lives upstairs on the third floor and she got sick.”

When asked about speculation he had contracted the virus, the WWE Hall of Famer told the outlet his health is “excellent” and the claims were “absolutely incorrect.”

Ric Flair marries Wendy Barlow

Through a WWE representative, Flair told PEOPLE he had nothing further to say about the situation.

According to the Post, Flair was recently criticized after he was photographed visiting a Starbucks drive-thru and interacting with one of the cafe’s staff members without a mask.

As noted by the outlet, Flair partnered with the American College Of Surgeons in April to help promote staying at home to limit the spread of the virus.

“[I’m] telling you, asking you, to stay home and stop the spread, and to thank all the people in the world of medicine today that are working to bring this virus to an end,” Flair said in the video. “Let’s do this together, stay home and stop the spread.”

Ric Flair and Wendy Barlow

Flair has had a number of health issues over the years, including an emergency in August 2017 when it was revealed he was in the early stages of kidney failure and on the verge of congestive heart failure — the result of years of alcohol abuse, PEOPLE previously reported.

Doctors at the time told Flair he only had a 20 percent chance of surviving and he was placed into a medically induced coma before eventually recovering.